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College of Arts & Sciences
School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment


Blaine Griffen

Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences &
the School of the Earth, Ocean & Environment

Phone Number: 803-603-9532
Email: bgriffen@biol.sc.edu
Website: http://ww2.biol.sc.edu/~bgriffen/index.html
Office: EWS 615
Research Areas: Climate Change
Marine Ecology and Evolution
Conservation Biology
Research Summary:

I study the responses of natural systems to human impacts such as species invasion, climate change, habitat destruction, fishing pressure, etc. I am particularly interested in how these activities influence biodiversity within species. The overarching goal of my research is to improve our ability to predict the responses of populations and communities to future human impacts.  

Curriculum vitae: Download PDF
Blaine Griffen

I study the responses of natural systems to human impacts such as species invasion, climate change, habitat destruction, fishing pressure, etc. I am particularly interested in how these activities influence biodiversity within species (i.e., the diversity of functional traits seen within species, such as size or personality). The overarching goal of my research is to improve our ability to predict the responses of populations and communities to future human impacts. I generally take a bottom up mechanistic approach, determining how behavior, physiology, and morphology facilitate or constrain the responses of individuals to environmental change, and how those individual level responses then scale up to establish patterns and processes at the population and community levels. I do this using a variety of approaches, including field observations, field and laboratory experiments, physiological measurements, and computer simulation modeling. While addressing questions of environmental change described above, my research simultaneously provides insight into fundamental aspects of organismal biology and physiology and into consumer foraging that is central to all ecological communities. Finally, my research also addresses areas where results can be applied to enhance management and conservation efforts.

Teaching 

MSCI 311: Biology of Marine Organisms MSCI 510/BIOL 510: Invertebrate Zoology MSCI 538/BIOL 538: Behavior of Marine Organisms MSCI 574: Marine Conservation Biology

Recent Publications 

 

(*denotes undergraduate student coauthor; **denotes graduate student coauthor)

Belgrad BA, Griffen BD (2016) Predator-prey interactions mediated by prey personality and predator hunting mode. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 283:20160408

Knotts ER, Griffen BD (2016) Individual movement rates are sufficient to determine and maintain dynamic spatial positioning within Uca pugilator herds. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 70:639-646

Griffen BD (2016) Scaling impacts of interactions between invaders from the individual to the population level. Ecology and Evolution 6(6): 1769–1777

**Belgrad BA, Griffen BD (2016) The influence of dietary shifts on the fitness of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidusPLOS One11(1):e0145481

Griffen BD, **Belgrad BA, **Cannizzo ZJ, **Knotts ER, *Hancock E (2016) Rethinking our approach to multiple stressor studies in marine environments. Marine Ecology Progress Series 543:273-281

Griffin JN, **Toscano BJ, Griffen BD, Silliman BR (2015) Does relative abundance modify multiple predator effects? Basic and Applied Ecology http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2015.05.003

Blakeslee AMH, Keogh CL, Fowler AE, Griffen BD (2015) Trematode infection does little to hinder invasive green crabs in eastern North America. PLOS One 10(6): e0128674

Griffen BD, **Riley ME (2015) Potential impacts of invasive crabs on one life history strategy of native rock crabs in the Gulf of Maine Biological Invasions 17:2533-2544

Griffen BD, *Norelli AP (2015) Spatially variable habitat quality contributes to within-population variation in reproductive success. Ecology and Evolution

Griffen BD, *Vogel M, *Goulding L, *Hartman R (2015) Energetic effects of diet choice by invasive Asian shore crabs: implications for persistence when prey are scarce. Marine Ecology Progress Series doi: 10.3354/meps11160

**Belgrad BA, Griffen BD (2015) Rhizocephalan infection modifies host food consumption by reducing host activity levels Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 466:70-75

**Riley ME, **Johnston CA, Feller IC, Griffen BD (2014) Mismatched rates of climate change-induced range expansion enable species to establish in novel habitat types. Southeastern Naturalist 13:N43-N48

**Hogan JM, Griffen BD (2014)The dietary and reproductive consequences of fisher-related claw removal for the stone crabMenippe spp. Journal of Shellfish Research 33:795-804

**Toscano BJ, Griffen BD (2014) Trait-mediated functional responses: predator behavioral type mediates prey consumption.Journal of Animal Ecology 83:1469-1477

**Toscano BJ, *Newsome WB, Griffen BD (2014) Parasite effects on predator functional response. Oecologia 175:345-352

**Toscano BJ, Gato J, Griffen BD (2014) Effects of predation threat on repeatability of individual crab behavior revealed by mark recapture. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 68:519-527

**Riley ME, *Vogel M, Griffen BD (2014) Fitness-associated consequences of an omnivorous diet for the mangrove tree crabAratus pisoniiAquatic Biology 20:35-43

Griffen BD (2014) Linking individual diet and fecundity in an omnivorous marine consumer. Oecologia 174:121-130